What Are You Willing to Do?

Book promotion -- Facebook

Every now and then, despite my advanced years and practice in ignoring “promotion” and its requirements and details, I happen to notice some new trend in self-advertising, and spend several seconds-or-minutes-that-feel-like-hours with my mouth hanging open that someone could and would do “that” to try to get people to read their books.

Then I hit myself on the head with one of the 17 books I’ve written while mostly ignoring that advice, and get on with whatever I’m doing that I enjoy more than promotion– like mopping the kitchen floor. Cleaning the toilet with a new homemade mixture someone recommended. Making ham fried rice for lunch to use up those leftovers.

If you enjoy doing readings of your work, and hearing applause, answering questions like, “Where do you get your ideas?” do the kind of promotion that leads you into those situations. Such promotion takes huge amounts of energy and patience. Many writers may not realize how completely we arrange our writing world, our home, so that it suits us– until we get out in a world of poor lighting, noise, and intrusive questions. If you hate those things, perhaps there’s another way to find readers.

Readers are what we want. And not all promotion leads to readers. Some leads only to more promotion.

I will not soon forget one of my best-paying jobs when I was escorted to a large auditorium to give my reading and found only two people there: one student, and one elderly woman who had apparently wandered away from a facility for the mentally unstable. I sat on the edge of the stage and talked with the two audience members, giving them as good a talk as I have ever done. But I might have been at home doing my work, which is writing.

And I don’t suppose the fine man who invited me to that school– and arranged for me to be paid well for coming– ever got over the embarrassment of having no one, not even those of his own classes or his teaching colleagues, show up. ​

Book promotion -- speaking to groups

I love to do readings. I speak well, and learned from some fine speech coaches how to project and how to draw an audience into my world for an hour. I know many colleges and universities could afford the price I ask for a talk or reading and I would enjoy doing it.

But in order to accept such an invitation, I may have to drive for hours, ride unreliable public transportation, sleep in a noisy motel and eat bad food. I have to consider all those negatives while considering the positive gain of the money and the recognition.

Book promotion -- book storesToo often, even from prestigious and well-endowed institutions, the invitation is, “Please come and read your work to our freshman students. We’ll allow you to sell your books for compensation.” I have largely given up explaining why such an invitation is an insult, and the institution isn’t listening anyway, because they can get 5 young authors anxious to promote themselves for the price of my honorarium. Once some of those authors bring bedbugs home from a cheap motel, they will be less enthusiastic.

But the world has created Facebook and a number of other media with which I am not familiar– Twitter? LinkedIn? Skype? I recently saw a headline informing me of “60+ social media sites you need to know about in 2019.”  Even checking out all 60 of those sites would take me less time than preparing for a 15-minute talk.

In addition, with help from an excellent assistant, I have a website, a Facebook page, a YouTube channel, and this blog. I can sit in the comfort of my study writing what I want to write and through those venues can reach hundreds more people than I would reach after a nine-hour drive somewhere.

So do the research on what “promotion” venues exist, and consider which ones might suit your temperament. Think of the people you want to read your books. These would be intelligent and thoughtful readers who might write you short notes of appreciation, or even question some of your premises and with whom you could have an enjoyable exchange of ideas.

Who are those people? Where are they? How can you reach them? Then craft the kind of promotion that will allow you to find them and enjoy their company– while continuing to write.

To quote a friend, “Write the F#$%ING thing!” is the best advice I can give you about self-promotion.

Linda M. Hasselstrom
Windbreak House Writing Retreats
Hermosa, South Dakota

© 2019, Linda M. Hasselstrom

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This blog started as correspondence with a writer friend, who is quoted in the last line. Read her book and very fine blog “Between Urban and Wild.”

See my website events page “Where in the World Is Linda M. Hasselstrom?” and scroll down through many years of my own writing promotion, including art exhibits, awards, billboards, classes, entertainment events, interviews, talks, workshops, and my own writing retreats.

Of course nothing beats a testimonial by a famous person!

Book promotion - testimonials by famous people

 

 

Promoting Your Writing

AlbertChinaSeriesOne of my heroines in the writing business is Susan Wittig Albert, who besides being the author of the popular China Bayles herbal mysteries and founder of Story Circle Network, a nonprofit organization for writing women, has written books for young adults, books for women on life-writing, and all kinds of work-for-hire books when she was learning her craft. Her Together, Alone: A Memoir of Marriage and Place focuses on how she made the shift from University professor into a new marriage and writing career. Along the way she provides all kinds of writing advice.

“Marketing,” she says, “is a necessary fact of the writing life.” Many of the writers who question me don’t ask about writing details: they want to know how to market. Almost all of them say, as I do, that they understand the difficulties of writing, but they loathe marketing and don’t know how to do it. Susan Albert agrees.

“Jane Austen never went on a book tour, or put together a brochure advertising her work, or handed out bookmarks.” Modern writers must do these things, and because of the Internet, the emphasis on promotion has grown. Writers are encouraged by publishers to set up web sites, blog, and be on Facebook. She adds, “Writers also do bookstore signings, give library talks, go to conferences, and generally make an effort to flaunt themselves, sometimes with the financial backing of their publishing house, usually not.”

“Usually not.” That’s an important omission. Even writers fortunate enough to publish with big companies often get no promotion budget these days; they are expected to do all this time-consuming self-promotion without pay. And all these activities take time away from the writing that got them published in the first place.

SocialMediaLogosI approach self-promotion with the same attitude I have toward drinking alcohol: moderation. Neither drinking nor self-promotion is really necessary to preserve your life and sanity. Both can provide feelings of euphoria. Over-indulgence in either leads to headaches, and makes you wonder just what you said that left you with a feeling of loathing.

My method is to try to make self-promotion enjoyable but I do have a particular advantage. I couldn’t promote as well as I do without the thoughtful help of an assistant who maintains my website, Facebook page and WordPress blog. She also edits my writing, and decides what gets posted where and when. Because she has alerted me to the way these social media work, I sometimes get ideas that help with the promotion, but mostly I am able to do what I believe I do best. I write.

If you are a writer who needs to promote, look for someone to help. This might be a friend, employee or both (if you’re as lucky as I am), whose skills make promotion enjoyable and understandable. Perhaps you can barter with this person: your skills for his or hers. But don’t be chintzy; remember that unless someone is reading what you are writing, you can’t pay for the electricity to run your computer, so be prepared to understand what promotion is worth to you and compensate accordingly.

Linda M. Hasselstrom
Windbreak House Writing Retreats
Hermosa, South Dakota

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For more information:

These two entertaining blogs found at www.whimseydark.com/blog/ address the difference between pushing yourself on readers and pulling them into your writing.  The reader comments below each blog also have some good ideas.
Please Shut Up: Why Self-Promotion As an Author Doesn’t Work
Wait, Keep Talking: Author Self-Promotion That Actually Works

Website for Susan Wittig Albert:
http://www.susanalbert.com/

Website for Susan Wittig Albert’s China Bayles mysteries:
http://www.abouthyme.com/
There are many more titles than the 12 shown at the beginning of this blog, and I own every one of them.

Website for Story Circle Network:
http://www.storycircle.org/
I am a member of this organization and am featured in the Professional Directory here:
Story Circle Network Professional Directory

© 2016, Linda M. Hasselstrom

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