Announcing . . .

I’m pleased to announce a new book, coming soon!

Write Now, Here’s How is a distillation of years of experience as a writer, writing teacher, and writing retreat guide. In 40 chapters, I’ll tell you a great deal about the process of writing.

WriteNow book held outside SMALL

In Write Now, Here’s How, a dedicated and experienced writer leads you through forty entertaining essays that define six decades of writing challenges. You’ll feel as if you are conversing with author Linda M. Hasselstrom about how her challenging life on a working cattle ranch in the shortgrass prairie of Western South Dakota became material for seventeen books. Reading this book is like joining Hasselstrom in the quiet privacy of the retreat house, where dozens of writers have found their voices.

As I’ve entered my seventh decade, I’ve looked back at journals I kept for decades, at my own writing, and at letters and journals from my relatives and others. Much has changed. But no matter how much my life changed, I was writing.

I’ve worked as a journalist and a college professor. I’ve been divorced and widowed. I’ve settled down in several places for several reasons. As my life changed, however, I was always writing, and I rarely discard a draft. I never know what insight or information an early attempt at a particular piece of writing might contain that will be of value to me in later writing.

What is the most efficient way to monitor your valuable writing time? You’ll find answers here. How can you most efficiently organize your writing space-no matter how small? How can you fit serious writing into a life filled with work, family, and entertainment? Hasselstrom presents a variety of possibilities to help you choose a schedule that best suits you.

The purpose of this book is to pass information from my writing life on to other writers. Rereading what I wrote in past years has been useful for me, not only in matters of insight, but in matters of writing style. I can see things I would write differently today, but I have also discovered writing I consider good that has had few or no other readers.

My primary self-appointed job is writing for the purpose of helping people to appreciate the treasure this nation has in the grasslands of the Great Plains, and the ranchers who have preserved it for us, full of clean air, uncorrupted soil, and pure water.

And Hasselstrom doesn’t just explain; she demonstrates with examples from her own work how writers can begin to see the invisible. She gently leads you into meditations that will help you create a writing retreat in any busy week. With this perceptive woman, you will explore methods of defining the memoir that will become an important part of your writing.

One of my most useful writing tools has been my journal, and I believe strongly in the power of journaling to aid self-discovery. Write fiercely in your journal, I say, write recklessly. Do not let your inner editor slow you down. Do not channel that English teacher in high school who always found an error. Don’t think about spelling or grammar or how this will look in print. Emote. Stomp through the words. Fling handfuls of syllables in the air and let them land on your paper. Often the heat of the anger or the pain of the loss or the joy of the new love will inspire the perfectly correct words that will never emerge if you think “someone is going to read this.” Journals must be private; no one should read your journal any more than a stranger can pry open your brain and look inside. Your journal is your freedom, your inspiration, your guide, and ultimately your resource.

With Hasselstrom’s guidance, your writing will grow like a tulip, and bloom like wild pink roses along a dusty gravel road. Winston Churchill will teach you about persistence. Walking will become a vital part of your writing practice.

As you read her discussion about how much truth belongs in your nonfiction, you’ll feel as though you were sharing coffee at the retreat house table, or strolling a trail filled with opportunity.

Write Now, Here’s How will be published August 1st, but is available to pre-order on Amazon right now.

Linda M. Hasselstrom
Windbreak House Writing Retreats
Hermosa, South Dakota

© 2020, Linda M. Hasselstrom

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Write Now, Here’s How: Insights from Six Decades of Writing
by Linda M. Hasselstrom
Lame Johnny Press, August 1, 2020
Paperback, 312 pages, 6 x 9 inches
ISBN: 978-0917624018
$19.95

8 thoughts on “Announcing . . .

      1. I completed, at least to the final author edit, a novel and have begun another. So different to write fiction. I can make things up! Happy that you read my blog.
        Loved your last post about libraries. I had just prepared a post from my sister that included a note from me in a book.

  1. julieweston

    Dear Linda, This sounds like a wonderful book! I try not to buy books on Amazon. Is it possible to send you a check with postage and have you mail directly to me? If so, please let me know amount and address and I will send. Thank you! I think I’ve read nearly all of your books and loved each one, although I am from the mountains and Idaho and the watery reaches of Seattle.

    All the best,Julie Westonwww.julieweston.com

    1. Hi Julie, sorry for the delay responding. I have ordered a couple boxes of the book and should have them soon. Cover price is $19.95 plus media mail shipping of $4 comes to $23.95. If you live in South Dakota, please add $1.56 state sales tax (6.5%) for a total of $25.51 Thank you!

      Linda M. Hasselstrom
      PO Box 169
      Hermosa SD 57744

      I will autograph the book, but let me know if you would like any personalized inscription when you mail your check.

    1. Thanks, Andrea.

      I’ve been staying pretty close to home except for essential trips and so far have avoided anything contagious. How are you and yours? We people who live outside of town are perhaps having an easier time with the physical distancing.

  2. Congratulations, paintshark! I think that’s a terrific accomplishment! I have tried novels a couple of times, and the result was not satisfactory. My late husband George said solemnly, “You just can’t make things up.” I chose to take that as a compliment and a suggestion to stick to nonfiction!

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